Wednesday, December 29, 2010

No-Knead Cranberry and Walnut Bread

My daughter was coming over for lunch. Tuna Salad, I thought, would be delicious on Cranberry and Walnut Bread. It was!

No-Knead Cranberry and Walnut Bread from Bruce's Kitchen.
Formula
2 cups bread flour
2 cups rye flour
2 cups warm water
1/2 teaspoon yeast
2 teaspoons salt
1 tablespoon sugar
2 cups cranberries
1 cup roughly chopped walnuts
olive oil (for coating)
extra flour, wheat bran, or cornmeal (for dusting)

Equipment:
One medium mixing bowl
6 to 8 quart pot with lid (Pyrex glass, Le Creuset cast iron, or ceramic)
Wooden Spoon or spatula (optional)
Plastic wrap
Two or three cotton dish towels (not terrycloth)

Process:
Mix all of the dry ingredients in a medium bowl. Add dried cranberries and walnuts. Add water and incorporate by hand or with a wooden spoon or spatula for 30 seconds to 1 minute. Lightly coat the inside of the bowl with olive oil. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let the dough rest 12 hours (or more) at room temperature (approx. 65-72°F).

Remove the dough from the bowl and fold once or twice. Let the dough rest 15 minutes in the bowl or on the work surface. Next, shape the dough into ball. Generously coat a cotton towel with flour, wheat bran, or cornmeal; place the dough seam side down on the towel and dust with flour. Cover the dough with a cotton towel and let rise 1-2 hours at room temperature, until more than doubled in size.

Preheat oven to 450-500°F. Place the pot in the oven at least 30 minutes prior to baking to preheat. Once the dough has more than doubled in volume, remove the pot from the oven and place the dough in the pot seam side up. Cover with the lid and bake 30 minutes Then remove the lid and bake 15-30 minutes uncovered, until the loaf is nicely browned.

Tuna Salad on Cranberry Walnut Bread.
Let me know if you make no-knead bread.
I would love to hear from you!


If you want distinctive nature, documentary or portrait photography--photography with soul that inspires you to live a more artful and beautiful life, please contact me

Sunday, December 26, 2010

No-Knead Fig and Fennel Bread

I made this to bring over to my sister-in-law's house for Christmas Dinner. I started the process Christmas Eve afternoon. It was delicious! Sweet and Moist!

Fig and Fennel Bread. Photo by Bruce Barone.
Formula
 
2 cups bread flour
2 cups rye flour
2 cups warm water
1/2 teaspoon yeast
2 teaspoons salt
1 tablespoon sugar
1 8 ounce jar fig preserves
2 tablespoons fennel seeds
olive oil (for coating)
extra flour, wheat bran, or cornmeal (for dusting)

Equipment:
 
One medium mixing bowl
6 to 8 quart pot with lid (Pyrex glass, Le Creuset cast iron, or ceramic)
Wooden Spoon or spatula (optional)
Plastic wrap
Two or three cotton dish towels (not terrycloth)

Process:
 
Mix all of the dry ingredients in a medium bowl. Add fennel seeds and fig preserves--use a fork or spoon to add a little of the preserves at a time. Add water and incorporate by hand or with a wooden spoon or spatula for 30 seconds to 1 minute. Lightly coat the inside of the bowl with olive oil. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let the dough rest 12 hours (or more) at room temperature (approx. 65-72°F).

Remove the dough from the bowl and fold once or twice. Let the dough rest 15 minutes in the bowl or on the work surface. Next, shape the dough into ball. Generously coat a cotton towel with flour, wheat bran, or cornmeal; place the dough seam side down on the towel and dust with flour. Cover the dough with a cotton towel and let rise 1-2 hours at room temperature, until more than doubled in size.

Preheat oven to 450-500°F. Place the pot in the oven at least 30 minutes prior to baking to preheat. Once the dough has more than doubled in volume, remove the pot from the oven and place the dough in the pot seam side up. Cover with the lid and bake 30 minutes Then remove the lid and bake 15-30 minutes uncovered, until the loaf is nicely browned.

Let me know if you make no-knead bread.
I would love to hear from you!

If you want distinctive nature, documentary or portrait photography--photography with soul that inspires you to live a more artful and beautiful life, please contact me

Monday, December 20, 2010

No-Knead Rye Bread

I have been wanting to make bread for a long time. And when I saw an article about Sullivan Street Bakery in The New York Times a few years ago, my appetite increased ten-fold for making bread.

I combined Jim Lahey's basic recipe for baking the perfect loaf of bread at home with a rye-bread recipe I found on long-time blogger, Rebecca Blood's website, Rebecca's Pocket.

I recommend watching a few videos on YouTube. There is even one with Jim Lahey and Mark Bittman, who wrote the article about Sullivan Street Bakery which appeared in The New York Times!

Bruce's First Loaf of Rye Bread.
From Sullivan Street Bakery:


Formula
 
3 cups (430g) flour
1½ cups (345g or 12oz) water
¼ teaspoon (1g) yeast
1¼ teaspoon (8g) salt
olive oil (for coating)
extra flour, wheat bran, or cornmeal (for dusting)

Equipment:
 
Two medium mixing bowls (Note: I used only one bowl)
6 to 8 quart pot with lid (Pyrex glass, Le Creuset cast iron, or ceramic)
Wooden Spoon or spatula (optional)
Plastic wrap
Two or three cotton dish towels (not terrycloth)

Process:
 
Mix all of the dry ingredients in a medium bowl. Add water and incorporate by hand or with a wooden spoon or spatula for 30 seconds to 1 minute. Lightly coat the inside of a second medium bowl with olive oil and place the dough in the bowl. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let the dough rest 12 hours at room temperature (approx. 65-72°F).

Remove the dough from the bowl and fold once or twice. Let the dough rest 15 minutes in the bowl or on the work surface. Next, shape the dough into ball. Generously coat a cotton towel with flour, wheat bran, or cornmeal; place the dough seam side down on the towel and dust with flour. Cover the dough with a cotton towel and let rise 1-2 hours at room temperature, until more than doubled in size.

Preheat oven to 450-500°F. Place the pot in the oven at least 30 minutes prior to baking to preheat. Once the dough has more than doubled in volume, remove the pot from the oven and place the dough in the pot seam side up. Cover with the lid and bake 30 minutes Then remove the lid and bake 15-30 minutes uncovered, until the loaf is nicely browned.

From Rebecca's Pocket:

During Week 3 of Eating Organic on a Food Stamp Budget, reader John Desmond commented that he had developed recipes for whole grain breads using the no-knead method. He has kindly agreed to share them here:
He says, "The directions are the same for all the recipes. Here are the ingredients:"
Whole Wheat Bread
2 cups bread flour
2 cups whole wheat flour
2 tsp salt
3 Tbsp honey
1/2 tsp yeast
2 cups water
Rye Bread
2 cups bread flour
2 cups rye flour
2 tsp salt
1 Tbsp caraway seeds
1/2 tsp yeast
2 cups water
Pumpernickel Bread
2 cups bread flour
2 cups rye flour
2 tsp salt
3 Tbsp cocoa
3 Tbsp molasses
1/2 tsp yeast
2 cups water
Susan and I actually bought a new pot for bread making (and for soups and stews); a KitchenAid Cast Iron Enameled Pot.

Bruce's First Loaf of Rye Bread Hot Out of the Oven.
Let me know if you make no-knead bread.
I would love to hear from you!

If you want distinctive nature, documentary or portrait photography--photography with soul that inspires you to live a more artful and beautiful life, please contact me.

Friday, December 17, 2010

Christmas Eve Menu

At the Home of Bruce & Susan

Stilton Cheese & Cheddar Cheese with Crackers
Cheese Wafers
Sweet & Spicy Nut Mix
Sweetened Almond, Cranberry, Coconut Mix
Olives & Pickles
Fresh Vegetables with Yogurt Dip
Turkey Kielbasa with Mustard & Rye Bread
Shrimp with Cocktail Sauce
Cocktail Meatballs
Lasagna
Baked Macaroni & Cheese
Cookies
 Christmas Cake
Wines, Beers, Bottled Waters, Juices, Sodas, Coffee, Tea

Tuesday, December 14, 2010

Sweet Pea Crostini

This is a perfect, beautiful, delicious appetizer for your Christmas Eve or Day Party!

Sweet Pea Crostini. Photo by Bruce Barone.

Ingredients

  1. 2 cups chicken broth
  2. 1 teaspoon red pepper flakes
  3. 1 (16-ounce) bag frozen peas
  4. 1/4 cup fresh chopped mint
  5. 3/4 teaspoon salt
  6. 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  7. 1/2 cup whipping cream

Directions

  1. For the Sweet Peas: Warm the chicken broth and red pepper flakes in a medium saucepan over medium-high heat until the broth boils. Add the frozen peas and cook until the peas are tender, about 5 minutes. Drain the peas in a mesh sieve. Place the peas in a food processor with the mint, salt, and pepper. Puree the pea mixture. Place the pea puree in a medium bowl and refrigerate until cool, about 30 minutes.
  2. Meanwhile, for the crostini: Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. Place the baguette slices on a parchment paper-lined baking sheet in a single layer. Bake in the oven until toasted and golden around the edges, about 10 minutes. While the crostini are still warm, drizzle the tops with extra-virgin olive oil. Using a whole clove of garlic in your fingertips, rub the top of the crostini a few times to give a hint of garlic.
  3. To finish, whip the cream until stiff peaks form. Fold the whipped cream into the pea puree. Top each of the crostini with about 1 tablespoon of pea puree. Sprinkle with a bit of the diced prosciutto. Serve immediately.

Sunday, December 12, 2010

Joel Robuchon's Boeuf Bourguignon

Joel Robuchon is the man Gault Millau guide has proclaimed "Chef of the Century."

Patricia Wells writes: "To describe Joel Robuchon as a cook is a bit like calling Pablo Picasso a painter, Luciano Pavorotti a singer, Frederic Chopin a pianist."

My son, Daryl, gave me The Complete Robuchon for a Christmas present last year. There is not one photograph in the book, but don't let this fact frighten you away for this delicious cookbook which no serious cook should be without; 800 precise, easy-to-follow recipes.

I have made this dish a number of times and people have loved the aroma and flavor. I make one small change which I will note in the text of the recipe.

Serving Tray (a present from my daughter) filled with steaming Boeuf Bourguinon.
Serves 6

Chef writes: Now we (and the French) say boeuf bourguignon, but once upon a time this dish was called pièce de boeuf a la bourguignonne (a piece of beef cooked in the style of Burgundy). Then it would have been prepared with a rump roast weighing at least 4 pounds cooked whole. Now the custom is to chop th emeat into cubes so that dish doesn't have to cook so long. The best red wine sauces include a bit of flour. Classic French cusine used much too much, and the nouvelle cuisine of the 1970s banished it heedlessly. Flour deserves neither this excess of honor now this complete refusal. Well used, as it is here, it does a fine job of thickening sauces.

Ingredients

1 bottle red Burgundy or Pinot Noir wine
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon peanut oil
4 tablespoon butter
2 pounds rump pot roast, cut into 2-inch cubes (ask your butcher to do this) (I halved them once again at home)
2 medium carrots, peeled and sliced into rounds 1/4 inch thick
2 medium onions, peeled and sliced into rounds 1/4 inch thick
2 tablespoons butter
Crushed black pepper
3 cups beef broth (I made my own and always have some in the freezer)
1 bouquet garni (1 sprig fresh thyme, 2 celery stalks, 1/2 bay leaf, and 3 stems flat-leaf parsley, wrapped and tied in a green leek leaf; I put it all together in cheesecloth and tied; see photo below)
2 cloves garlic, peeled and degermed
16 small white or cipollini onions, peeled
1 teaspoon coarse salt
1 teaspoon superfine sugar
Pepper
1/2 pound lardons (I bought slab bacon from my butcher)
5 ounces small button or cup mushrooms, cleaned and stems trimmed
Salt
1 tablespoon minced parsley

Directions

1. Put the wine in a saucepan and bring to a boil. Simmer for 20 minutes.
2. In the meantime, heat 1 tablespoon peanut oil in a large saucepan or Dutch oven. Add 3 tablespoons butter; when it foams, add the cubes of meat. Brown them for 5 minutes over medium heat, stirring them with a wooden spoon to make sure they get browned on all sides.
3. Using a skimmer or slotted spoon, remove the meat to a deep dish. Put the carrots and onions into the pot in which the meat was browned and cook for 5 minutes over very low heat, stirring once or twice to keep them from darkening.
4. Sprinkle the meat with the flour and put it back into the pot along with 1 scant teaspoon crushed black pepper. Turn the heat to medium and cook, stirring constantly, for 5 minutes, just long enough to remove the flour's raw taste.
5. Pour half of the broth into the pot and stir. Then pour in the wine and the remaining broth. It should come just high enough to cover the meat. Add the bouquet garni and garlic, and cover. Simmer gently for 2 hours. Every 30 minutes skim the foam from the surface and then stir the pot to redistribute the meat (Note; I saw very very little foam.).
6. While the meat cooks, put the onions into a saucepan with 1 quart water and the coarse salt. Bring the liquid to a boil and simmer for 2 minutes. Drain them in a colander.
7. Melt 1 tablespoon butter in a saute pan or small saucepan. Add the onions and superfine sugar, season with pepper, cover, and cook over low heat for 20 minutes, rotating the pan every 5 minutes, until the onions are quite tender and pale golden. Keep a close eye on them; they should not turn too dark. Drain them in a colander and set on top of a plate.
8. Heat 1 teaspoon peanut oil in a skillet and then add the lardons (I used diced slab bacon from my butcher). Cook them for 5 minutes over medium heat, stirring. When they are browned, use a slotted spoon to put them in the colander with the onions, leaving their fat in the pan. Add the mushrooms to this pan and cook over medium heat, stirring. Season lightly with salt and pepper. Add the mushrooms to the onions and lardons in the colander.
9. (Note: at this point I added the onions, mushrooms, and lardons to the meat in the pot, cooked a bit longer, and served.) Chef writes: When the stew has been simmering for 2 hours, use a large spoon to remove the grease from the surface (There was no grease in mine.) Remove the meat with a slotted spoon and put it in a large, deep serving dish. Put the lardons, onions and mushrooms into the same dish. Put the meat's sauce through a fine strainer into another saucepan, bring it to a simmer and simmer for 5 minutes. Taste for salt and pepper. This dish should be quite peppery. Pour the sauce over the meat and vegetables and sprinkle with minced parsley.

Bruce's serving of Robuchon's Boeuf Bourguinon.
Truste me; you and your guests will want seconds. And your home will smell wonderful from the aromas of the Boeuf Bourguinon. And here is the promised photo of the bouquet garni:

Thursday, December 9, 2010

Thai Chunky Peanut Butter Chicken with Asian Quinoa & Sautéed Spinach with Garlic

This was so delicious that when a friend saw it online he made it for his grandmother and she loved it!



Ingredients

  1. 3 chicken breasts cut into thin strips
  2. 1/4  cup olive oil (for the wok)
  3. 1 clove garlic, peeled and smashed
  4. 3 tablespoons chunky peanut butter (I used Nature's Best Organic)
  5. 2 tablespoons olive or peanut oil (I used olive oil)
  6. 3 teaspoons soy sauce
  7. 3 teaspoons white vinegar
  8. 1/2 teaspoon sugar
  9. 1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  10. 2 tablespoons homemade chicken stock (or water)
  11. 4 green onions, chopped
  12. 1 carrot, grated
  13. A liberal amount of Tabasco sauce

Directions

  1. Mix together 4-13. Add more stock if you feel mixture is too dry. Mine was very smooth.
  2. Heat wok, add oil and garlic. When garlic starts to turn brown take out and add chicken. Stir fry till done.
  3. Add sauce to chicken in wok and stir fry till warm.

Sunday, November 28, 2010

Turkey Roulade

One week before Thanksgiving I saw Ina Garten prepare this on TV. And I said, "That's what I will make this year!"

It was delicious.

 Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup large-diced dried figs, stems removed
  • 3/4 cup dried cranberries
  • 1/2 cup Calvados or brandy
  • 4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) unsalted butter
  • 1 1/2 cups diced onions (2 onions)
  • 1 cup (1/2-inch-diced) celery (3 stalks)
  • 3/4 pound pork sausage, casings removed (sweet and hot mixed) (I used only sweet)
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons chopped fresh rosemary leaves
  • 3 tablespoons pine nuts, toasted
  • 3 cups herb-seasoned stuffing mix (recommended: Pepperidge Farm)
  • 1 1/2 cups chicken stock, preferably homemade
  • 1 extra-large egg, beaten
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 whole (2 halves) turkey breast, boned and butterflied (5 pounds)
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted

Directions

1. Place the dried figs and cranberries in a small saucepan and pour in the Calvados and 1/2 cup water. Bring the mixture to a boil over medium heat, then lower the heat and simmer for 2 minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside.

2. Meanwhile, melt the butter in a large (12-inch) skillet over medium heat. Add the onions and celery and saute until softened, about 5 minutes. Add the sausage, crumbling it into small bits with a fork, and saute, stirring frequently, for 10 minutes, until cooked and browned. Add the figs and cranberries with the liquid, the chopped rosemary, and pine nuts, and cook for 2 more minutes. Scrape up the brown bits with a wooden spoon.

3. Place the stuffing mix in a large bowl. Add the sausage mixture, chicken stock, egg, 1 teaspoon salt, and 1/2 teaspoon pepper and stir well. (The stuffing may be prepared ahead and stored in the refrigerator overnight.) (This is what I did.)

4. Preheat the oven to 325 degrees F. Place a baking rack on a sheet pan.

5. Lay the butterflied turkey breast skin side down on a cutting board. Sprinkle the meat with 2 teaspoons salt and 1 teaspoon pepper. Spread the stuffing in a 1/2-inch-thick layer over the meat, leaving a half-inch border on all sides. Don't mound the stuffing or the turkey will be difficult to roll. (Place the leftover stuffing in a buttered gratin dish and bake for the last 45 minutes of roasting alongside the turkey.)

6. Starting at 1 end, roll the turkey like a jelly roll and tuck in any stuffing that tries to escape on the sides. Tie the roast firmly with kitchen twine every 2 inches to make a compact cylinder.

7. Place the stuffed turkey breast seam side down on the rack on the sheet pan. Brush with the melted butter, sprinkle generously with salt and pepper, and roast for 1 3/4 to 2 hours, until an instant-read thermometer registers 150 degrees F in the center. (I test in a few places.) Cover the turkey with aluminum foil and allow it to rest at room temperature for 15 minutes. Carve 1/2-inch-thick slices and serve warm with the extra stuffing.

Note: I used a roasting pan. After one hour I felt that the turkey roulade was not browning sufficiently, so I raised the oven temperature to 400. Total cooking time was 2 hours and the turkey roulade was moist and very flavorful.

Here's my plate:


I also made butternut squash (not pictured; flavored with maple syrup), garlic mashed potatoes, and Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Sun-dried tomatoes (These I trimmed, cut in half, seasoned with Kosher salt and pepper and 2 tablespoons of olive oil and roasted in oven for about 30 minutes, turning once and adding the sun-dried tomatoes the last five minutes. Susan made the cranberry sauce, to which she adds mango.

Do you have a favorite turkey recipe?
I would love to hear from you!


If you want distinctive nature, documentary or portrait photography--photography with soul that inspires you to live a more artful and beautiful life,
please contact me. Thank You!

Tuesday, November 23, 2010

Tamago-Yaki

My son and daughter love this!

And I make it every Thanksgiving morning for them.


Very popular at breakfast or in Japanese boxed lunches called obento, this omelette has a delicate sweet flavor and a pretty layered look when sliced. You may have tried it already at sushi shops, where a thin slab of rolled omelette is seved atop vinegared rice, wrapped in a strip of nori seaweed. This recipe can be adapted so that it contains more or less sugar, and dashi broth may also be added, depending on your preferences. For a colorful variation, try adding chopped parsley to the beaten eggs before frying. Made without sugar it is delicious in sandwiches and rolled sushi.
6 eggs
2 tablespoons sugar
2 teaspoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons sake or mirin
2 teaspoons vegetable oil
Beat the eggs well and blend in the sugar, soy sauce, and sake. Heat oil in a large skillet. Over low heat, add 1/6 of the egg mixture and let it spread evenly over the bottom of the skillet. As the egg becomes half-done, roll it from one edge of the skillet tot he other and let it rest on one side of the skillet. Pour a similar amount of the egg mixture into the skillet, making sure it spreads underneath the resting omelette roll. When this new layer becomes half-done, fold the first omelette roll inside, rolling from edge to edge. Repeat with another 1/6 of the egg mixture until you have a fairly think omelette roll. Slice into thick sections and serve.
Note: It is best to use a square skillet. I like a little bit more soy sauce in the mixture.


Have you ever eaten Tamago-Yaki? I would love to hear from you!

Thursday, November 18, 2010

Mandarin Orange and Arugula Salad

Looking for a "WOW" salad? This IS it!


Ingredients

2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
5 tablespoons mandarin orange juice
2 tablespoons Orange Muscat Champagne Vinegar
1 tablespoons Walnut Oil
1 tablespoon minced orange zest
1 teaspoon sugar
1 teaspoon poppy seeds
6 cups arugula, washed and patted dry
1 cup mandarin oranges
1/4 cup nicoise olives, halved
1/4 cup chopped walnuts
Parmesan shards

Directions

1. In a large bowl, blend first seven ingredients and set aside.
2. Divide the arugula among eight salad plates. Top the arugula with the mandarin oranges, olives, and nuts. Drizzle the dressing over, then place the Parmesan on the salads.

~Based on a recipe from Great Good Food by Julee Rosso.

Do you have a favorite salad recipe?
I would love to hear from you!


If you want distinctive nature, documentary or portrait photography--photography with soul that inspires you to live a more artful and beautiful life,
please contact me. Thank You!

Sunday, November 14, 2010

Maple Glazed Sockeye Salmon with Broccoli Rabe

Simple. Sensual. Seriously Delicious.

That's steam rising from the Broccoli Rabe!

INGREDIENTS

  • 1/4 cup pure maple syrup
  • 3 tablespoon reduced-sodium soy sauce
  • 1/4 teaspoon crushed red-pepper flakes
  • 1 lb Sockeye Salmon
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 4 teaspoon minced garlic
  • 1 ounce sun-dried tomatoes, sliced (about ½ cup)
  • 1 pound broccoli rabe, trimmed and cut into 2-inch pieces
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper

PREPARATION

Preheat oven to 425. In shallow dish, combine syrup, soy sauce and red-pepper flakes. Add salmon and turn to coat; set aside. Meanwhile, in large skillet, heat olive oil. Add garlic and sun-dried tomatoes; cook about 1 minute. Add broccoli rabe, water, salt and pepper. Stir and cover; cook over medium heat until soft, about 5 minutes. While broccoli rabe cooks, put sockeye salmon on a baking tray (I always put it first on a piece of aluminum foil) and cook for 10--12 minutes.

Do you have a favorite Salmon recipe? Or Broccoli Rabe?
I would love to hear from you!


If you want distinctive nature, documentary or portrait photography--photography with soul that inspires you to live a more artful and beautiful life,
please contact me. Thank You! 

Monday, November 1, 2010

Pasta & Shrimp in Broccoli Rabe Sauce

My daughter LOVES shrimp so I made this for her on Sunday for dinner.


Ingredients

1 pound fresh shrimp, peeled and deveined
1 bunch Broccoli Rabe
12 oz Gemelli pasta (My daughter's favorite!)
1 cup chicken stock (Preferably homemade!)
1/4 cup sour cream
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon white pepper
1 tablespoon lemon juice

Directions

1. Cook Broccoli Rabe in boiling water (I cooked it in the pasta water which was a pot of homemade chicken stock!) for about 6-8 minutes. Drain (I use one of those pots where you can lift out the colander and keep liquid in pot.) , reserving 1/4 cup of the stock. Set aside about half of the Rabe and cover to keep warm. In a food processor, puree remaining Rabe with the reserved cooking liquid till nearly smooth, but still slightly chunky.

2. Meanwhile, cook pasta till al dente. Add shrimp and remaining Rabe at the last minute. Drain.

3. In a saucepan stir together chicken stock, sour cream, flour, salt and pepper. Add Rabe puree and lemon juice. Cook over medium heat till thickened and bubbly. Add sauce to pasta mixture and toss to coat. Serve immediately. This dish does not require Parmesan cheese.

Monday, October 4, 2010

Meatballs

I bet you can't eat just three!


Ingredients

1 carrot, finely grated
2 eggs, beaten
1 pound mix of ground chuck, veal and pork
8 tablespoons bread crumbs
8 tablespoons milk
12 tablespoons fresh grated Parmesan cheese
6 tablespoons Vidalia onion, finely chopped
4 tablespoons garlic, finely minced
2 tablespoons fresh parsley, chopped
2 tablespoons fresh basil, chopped
2 tablespoons capers (approximately)

Directions

Combine all the above ingredients in a large bowl (except for capers). Roll meatballs gently into the size of golf balls. Push a few capers into the center of each meatball. Cook in hot extra virgin olive oil, turning frequently, till brown. Add to sauce. Serve with pasta and wine--and love.

Still hungry? Here--have a few more meatballs!


I photograph people and nature for a living.
My mission is to connect with people, inspire people, and build community.
How can I help and inspire you?


A tree is known by its fruit; we by our deeds. A good deed is never lost; one who sows courtesy reaps friendship, and one who plants kindness gathers love.
 
~Saint Basil

Tuesday, September 28, 2010

Chicken Soup with Butternut Squash & Mushrooms & Bulgur

I must share this with you! This was one of the greatest soups I have ever made--tasted! And the amazing thing to keep in mind is this: half of this recipe was from leftovers! Let me explain.

The night before I made this soup I roasted a chicken (This was a lemon, garlic, apple juice variation). It, too, was delicious. I then made stock from the chicken carcass, which I simmered during the evening and again for hours before making the soup. OH! The Butternut Squash was mashed and leftover, too; we made this with lots of butter and Five Spice. And it goes without saying that the Bulgur was leftover, too; we had this with the roast chicken (It had celery, red and green pepper, and golden raisins in it.).

So, I added some olive oil to a saucepan. Then I added 1 stalk celery, finely chopped; 1/2 Vidalia Onion, chopped; 1/2 red pepper, chopped--and cooked for about 10 minutes. Then I added 2 cups mushrooms, stemmed, halved and sliced--and cooked for about 5 minutes, gently. I then added 2 cups of my chicken stock and 1 cup of the mashed butternut squash and stirred until the squash was absorbed. A few minutes before serving, I added 2 cups chopped chicken, 1 teaspoon of fresh chopped tarragon and 1 cup of the cooked Bulgur.

Serves Two.



I photograph people and nature for a living.
My mission is to connect with people, inspire people, and build community. 
 
How can I help and inspire you?

Sunday, September 26, 2010

Cook of the Week

The passion started a long time ago:


Monday, September 20, 2010

A Remarkable Dinner & A Recipe

More than anything, this is a memory of a dinner. A memory of dinner with my Dad and my family. Memory helps to keep the past alive. Dad, though gone from this life, lives on in us--those at this dinner table.

It was the most unusual place.

A restaurant tucked away on a seldom-traveled street near the Massachusetts and New Hampshire borderline. Today, I am no longer sure of what state we were in!

Was there a sign? I do not recall. If there was a sign it was rather small; as was the restaurant.

There were no waiters or waitresses, nor busboys. There was the owner, The Chef.

"Is this your first time here?"

"Yes," we answered. There were my sisters, Michelle and Darlene. Their husbands, Stuart and Paul. My niece, Nina. My ex, Betsy, and our children, Danielle and Daryl. My brother, Dennis and his wife, Debbie. And there was my beloved Dad, Alfred (aka Fred) Barone.

"Put yourselves in my hands," said Chef. "I'll cook some special things just for you and then I'll bring them out, one-at-a-time. Appetizers. Little bites. Maybe some scallops to start. And Beet Tartare with Capers, Mustard and Shallots. Homemade breads and Extra Virgin Olive Oil  from Tuscany. Then some pasta. Ravioli. Tortellini. Anyone like Lobster Sauce? (We all nodded yes.) And then I'll bring you your special entrees. You can share. Veal Scallopini. Eggplant Parmesan. Seared Baby Squid with Parsley and Garlic. Sauteed Quail with Mustard and Garlic. And deserts, of course."

The kitchen was just a few steps away. And there were only a few tables in the restaurant. Maybe seven or eight; at the most ten small tables. All different in shape and size. The room I recall was dark; red brick--I have photographs, somewhere. There was a painting of Jesus on the Cross and across the room there were landscapes and maybe a portrait. It was eclectic but comforting, like instruments in an orchestra all working together to create a masterpiece.

The meal--the event--was a masterpiece. The little bites just kept coming out from the kitchen. And Chef would say, "Are you all enjoying your evening?"

Did I mention the hot bruschetta topped with garlic, basil and tomatoes? The olives and marinated eggplant?

I felt, we all felt, as if we were at home eating together in our kitchen--in Fred's Kitchen; Dad's Kitchen. It was that special. We drank wine, of course, all recommendations from Chef, and my children drank wine, too. Reds in large glasses. Bon Appetit!

The restaurant is no longer there but Chef has opened a new restaurant. If I ever open a restaurant it would be just like this most unusual place--or it will be a Food Truck--and I will call it Bruce's Kitchen and I will serve with love healthy and inspired food for everyday celebrations.

Here, have some soup.


"I feel like having soup for dinner," said Susan.

So I made Ribollita, which means 're-cooked' in Italy, and slow cooking is the secret of this hearty winter vegetable soup designed for wood stoves or back burners. There are many different recipes, but most Tuscan recipes call for cavolo nero - black leaf kale - the closest substitute being savoy (red) cabbage - and cannellini - tuscan white beans - the closest substitute being Great Northern beans. There are many variations, try the one that seems the most appealing to you. A specialty of Tuscany, this hearty bean and vegetable soup is served all over Florence in the winter. I used store-bought kale but you could substitute Savoy.

Ingredients
3 tbsp olive oil
2 medium red onions, coarsely chopped
3 carrots, sliced
3 celery stalks, coarsely chopped
3 garlic cloves, chopped
1 tbsp fresh thyme
14 oz canned cannellini beans, drained and rinsed
14 oz canned chopped tomatoes
2 1/2 cups vegetable stock
2 tbsp chopped fresh parsley
1 lb Tuscan kale, trimmed and sliced
1 small day-old or toasted ciabatta loaf, torn into small pieces
salt and pepper

Directions

Heat oil in large saucepan and cook onions, carrots, and celery for 10-15 minutes, stirring frequently. Add garlic, thyme, and salt and pepper to taste. Continue to cook for an additional few minutes, until the vegetables are golden and caramelized.

Add the cannellini beans and tomatoes. Add stock to cover. Bring to a boil and add kale and cook for 20-30 minutes, until kale is cooked. Stir in bread (or serve as side to sop). The soup should be thick.
Ladle into warmed serving bowls and serve hot, drizzled with extra virgin olive oil, and Parmesan cheese--if you desire. Serve with red wine. And LOVE!
Recipe from "Soup Bowl." Love Food books, an imprint of Parragon Books Ltd. '07

 Do you have a favorite and beautiful  memory about your family? I would love to hear about it!

Wednesday, September 15, 2010

Braised Cod and Golden Onions with Roasted Brussels Sprouts & Pecans

You will love this!

Ingredients

  1. 1 tablespoon butter + 1 tablespoon olive oil
  2. 2 Cod Loin, about 4 ounces each
  3. 1 large onion, thinly sliced
  4. 1/4 teaspoon fresh thyme, crumbled
  5. 1 bay leaf
  6. 1/4 cup homemade stock + 1/4 cup ginger ale
  7. Chives

Directions

  1. Melt butter in a heavy skillet over medium high heat. Add oil. Add sliced onions and cook until golden and soft, stirring frequently, about 12-15 minutes. Add thyme and bay leaf to skillet and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute. Season cod with salt and pepper and place on top of onions. Add stock and ginger ale. Bring liquids to a simmer. Reduce heat to medium-low, cover skillet, and braise cod until just cooked through, about 7 minutes. Garnish with chopped chives.
Do you have a favorite Cod recipe? I would love to hear about it!

Tuesday, September 7, 2010

Roasted Gazpacho

In his award-winning cookbook, How To Cook Everything, Mark Bittman writes: "My friend Ignacio Blanco makes this sensational gazpacho at his Connecticut restaurant, Meson Galicia." (Now called Meigas)

Note: Bittman's recipe (as written below) serves 6. I reduced it by half and it served four with plenty leftover. I served it with Roasted Three Peppers with Goat Cheese and Mafaldine Pasta.


Ingredients

4 ripe tomatoes
2 small or 1 medium eggplant, peeled and cut into large chucks
4 small or 2 medium zucchini, cut into large chunks
2 medium onions, cut into large chunks
About 10 cloves garlic, peeled
1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1/4 cup sherry vinegar
Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
4 cups water
4 slices stale bread, crusts removed and torn up

Directions

1. Preheat oven to 400. Combine the tomatoes, eggplant, zucchini, onions, garlic and olive oil in a large roasting pan; roast until the eggplant is tender, stirring occasionally, about 30 minutes.
2. Turn the mixture into a large bowl an add the vinegar, salt, pepper, water and bread. Refrigerate and let sit several hours or overnight.
3. In a food processor or blender, blend the mixture until smooth. Put it through a food mill or strainer to remove any remaining bits of skin, seeds, or other solids. Check the seasoning and serve.

Note: I did not put mine through a food mill. Next time I make it I think I am going to add a few jalapeno peppers.

Do you have a favorite Gazpacho recipe?  I would love to hear about it!

Let's make the world a more beautiful place!

Monday, September 6, 2010

Grilled Salmon with Mustard, Horseradish, Molasses

This simple dish combines the intense sweetness of molasses, the tangy taste of Dijon mustard, the zesty flavor of red wine vinegar, with the sharp kick of horseradish.


Ingredients

1 1/4 pounds Salmon (King, Coho or Sockeye)
2 tablespoons of Dijon Mustard
2 tablespoons molasses
2 tablespoons horseradish, drained
1 tablespoons red wine vinegar
salt and pepper

Directions

1. Rinse salmon and pat dry. Put on aluminum foil (I always then just place the foil with the salmon on grill and never flip the salmon).
2. Whisk together the mustard, molasses, horseradish, vinegar, salt and pepper.
3. Brush salmon with the molasses mixture.
4. Grill with 8--10 minutes (with grill top closed)

We served this with an endive, radish, cucumber, tomato salad. And a cucumber mousse, which Susan made.

Do you have a favorite Grilled Salmon recipe? I would love to hear about it!

Thursday, September 2, 2010

Salmon, Sunflower Seed Cakes with Horseradish Sauce

Simple, yet a bit unusual, this Salmon Cake is sure to please everyone.


Ingredients

8 ounces cooked Salmon (King, Coho, or Sockeye), flaked
2 tablespoons sunflower seeds
1 stalk celery, finely diced
1 green onion, chopped
1 heaping tablespoon mayonnaise
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1 teaspoon fresh dill, chopped
1 tablespoon Frank's Hot Sauce
1 small egg, beaten
A good dash or two or three Worcestershire Sauce

Directions

Mix all the ingredients together. Form into four cakes. Fry in hot oil till  brown. Serve with Horseradish Sauce (2 tablespoons mayonnaise, 2 tablespoons Greek Yogurt, 1 tablespoon drained horseradish, 1 teaspoon fresh dill--chopped).

I served this with a garden-fresh tomato, cucumber, basil salad over grilled eggplant. And a pasta salad with garlic, tomatoes, green olives, basil and oil.

Do you like Salmon Cakes? Do you have a favorite recipe?

If you would like to fill your home with beautiful photographs, or need a portrait, a wedding photographed or if you are an interior designer and need photographs of your projects, contact me for a consultation.

Drawing on that degree in Art History, a passion for telling stories, and years working as a portrait and documentary photographer (And owning an Art Gallery) helps me bring a heightened sensitivity to my photography. Let's make the world a more beautiful place! 

Tuesday, August 31, 2010

Roasted Salmon, Beets, and Potatoes with Horseradish Cream

Salmon is on the menu in Bruce's Kitchen two, sometimes three, times a week. And to my mind, this dish makes a great Saturday or Sunday Brunch, which is exactly what Susan and I did this past weekend; serving it to her childhood friend, Cheryl. This recipe is based upon one from Food & Wine Quick From Scratch One-Dish Meals, which was a gift from another childhood friend. I love this cookbook!


Ingredients

  1. 1 1/2 pounds beets, peeled and cut into 1/2-inch dice
  2. 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  3. 1 teaspoon salt
  4. 1 1/2  tablespoons fresh dill, chopped
  5. Fresh-ground black pepper
  6. 1 1/2 pounds fingerling potatoes cut into 1/2-inch dice
  7. 1 1/2 pounds salmon (King, Coho, or Sockeye), 
  8. 1/2 cup Greek Yogurt
  9. 2 tablespoons drained bottled horseradish

Directions

  1. Heat the oven to 450'. In a large roasting pan, toss the beets with 1 tablespoon of the oil, 1/4 teaspoon of the salt, 1/2 tablespoon of the dill, and 1/8 teaspoon pepper. Cook in the upper third of the oven, stirring once, for about 20 minutes.
  2. Remove the pan from the oven and push the beets to one side. Add the potatoes to the pan, next to the beets, and toss them with the remaining 1 tablespoon oil and 1/4 teaspoon of the salt. Return the pan to the oven and cook for 10 minutes. Stir the potatoes and beets, keeping them separate; return the pan to the oven.
  3. Meanwhile, put the salmon (Slice three to four 1/2 slits crosswise in top of salmon) on another baking sheet (covered with aluminum foil) and sprinkle with 1/4 teaspoon of the salt, 1/2 tablespoon of the dill, and 1/8 teaspoon pepper. Put the pan in the oven with the vegetables (after you stir them at the end of Step 2). Cook until just done, about 10 minutes.
  4. Meanwhile, in a small bowl combine yogurt, horseradish, and 1/2 tablespoon of the dill.
  5. Stir the beets and the potatoes together. Serve the vegetables topped with the salmon and the horseradish sauce. 
Do you have a favorite way of cooking salmon? Share your recipe with me, please.

If you would like to fill your home with beautiful photographs, or need a portrait, a wedding photographed or if you are an interior designer and need photographs of your projects, contact me for a consultation.

Drawing on that degree in Art History, a passion for telling stories, and years working as a portrait and documentary photographer (And owning an Art Gallery) helps me bring a heightened sensitivity to my photography. Let's make the world a more beautiful place! 

Thursday, August 26, 2010

Not Your Mom's Eggplant

Many people, it seems to me, either love or dislike eggplant, so perhaps this recipe isn't the best choice for a dinner party or backyard picnic, where you don't know your guests' taste too well--but, maybe it is.

If you are an eggplant person, like me, and my friends and family, you will love this simple and sublime meal. It cries out for a summer lunch or dinner out in the back yard at the picnic table with lots of friends and bottles of wine.

Elegant. Fragrant. Gorgeous. Delicious. This simple recipe combines the sweetness of vine ripened tomatoes, the intensity of eggplant, and the delicate flavor of plain yogurt.

People who you think might not like eggplant; people who say they don't like eggplant, will have a serving--or two--and then quickly will come into the kitchen and shout in disbelief, "What happened to all the eggplant!"

I based this meal (Turkish Eggplant) from a recipe in a great cookbook, Recipes from a Kitchen Garden. If you don't own a copy of this cookbook, I urge you to buy a copy ASAP!


Ingredients

1 good sized eggplant, peeled or unpeeled (I like it peeled)
1 large clove of garlic, minced
2 tablespoons chopped fresh basil
3 ripe tomatoes, cored, seeded, chopped
1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
4 tablespoons plain yogurt

Directions

1. Cut (peel before hand if you desire) the eggplant into 1/2 inch slices. Salt each side and place in colander for 1-2 hours. Rinse and pat dry.
2. Brush both sides of eggplant with olive oil and broil them in oven on both sides until soft and browned. Watch closely!
3. Heat a saucepan and then add oil. Add garlic and cook for about 1 minute. Turn heat off. Add tomatoes and basil. Once eggplant is browned and you are ready to serve, gently heat tomato sauce.
4. On each plate, lay a few slices of eggplant. Top with tomato sauce. Finish by adding a tablespoon (+) of yogurt in the center of each slice.

I served this with Quinoa cooked with Saffron and Golden Raisins. And a salad of lettuce, cucumber, radish, fresh basil and parsley.

Do you have a great eggplant recipe? I would love to hear about it.

If you would like to fill your home with beautiful photographs, or need a portrait, a wedding photographed or if you are an interior designer and need photographs of your projects, contact me for a consultation.

Drawing on that degree in Art History, a passion for telling stories, and years working as a portrait and documentary photographer (And owning an Art Gallery) helps me bring a heightened sensitivity to my photography. Let's make the world a more beautiful place!

Monday, August 23, 2010

Maple Glazed Salmon

The new issue of Cooking Light arrived one day last week. The issue is full of some great recipes. I made a variation of the cover story recipe the day the issue arrived. Normally, I would have grilled the salmon but our grill was broken so I cooked the salmon in the oven at 450 for about 10 minutes. I served the salmon with roasted asparagus and tomatoes from our garden.


Ingredients

  • 1  teaspoon  paprika
  • 1/2  teaspoon  chili powder
  • 1/2  teaspoon  ground ancho chile powder
  • 1/4  teaspoon  ground cumin
  • 1/4  teaspoon  brown sugar
  • 1  teaspoon  kosher salt
  • 1 lb. Sockeye, Coho or King Salmon
  • 2  tablespoons  maple syrup

Preparation

1. Preheat oven.
2. Spoon maple syrup over Salmon.
3. Combine first 6 ingredients; rub spice mixture evenly over flesh side of fillets. Place fish on a shallow baking pan coated with covered with aluminum foil. Cook 8-12 minutes or until desired degree of doneness.

Do you have a favorite way of cooking salmon? Share your recipe with me, please.

If you would like to fill your home with beautiful photographs, or need a portrait, a wedding photographed or if you are an interior designer and need photographs of your projects, contact me for a consultation.

Drawing on that degree in Art History, a passion for telling stories, and years working as a portrait and documentary photographer (And owning an Art Gallery) helps me bring a heightened sensitivity to my photography. Let's make the world a more beautiful place!

Sunday, August 22, 2010

Tomato Times Two

I love going out into my garden in the morning and picking the ripe tomatoes. It is, I believe, and I hope you do, too, one the great pleasures of summer.
And is there anything better than fresh tomato sauce? There might be, of course, but I can't think of anything better right now. In fact, fresh tomato sauce is so sinfully delicious, so sensually delightful, so, so, yes, poetic, that I made it twice this week.

The basic recipe follows, which I based upon a recipe from a wonderful cookbook: Italian Food Artisans, Traditions and Recipes by Pamela Sheldon Johns. Feel free to add more or less garlic. Add a tablespoon of capers. Don't be bashful. Be inspired! Be creative in your kitchen!

Ingredients

1/2 pound pasta (I cooked Bow Tie pasta)
3-5 ripe tomatoes, seeded and roughly diced
2-3 cloves garlic, minced
1/4 cup pitted and roughly chopped Mediterranean style oil-cured black olives
1/4 cup fresh basil leaves, chopped
1/4 cup fresh parsley, chopped
Big pinch of hot red pepper flakes
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
Freshly grated Parmesan cheese

Directions

1. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add the pasta, stir well, and cook until al dente, about 10 minutes.
2. While the pasta is cooking, combine the tomatoes, garlic, basil, parsley, olives, pepper flakes, olive oil, salt and pepper in a large bowl.
3. Drain the pasta and add to the bowl. Toss well. Serve with the cheese at once.


Do you have a favorite pasta recipe? Tell me about it, please.

If you would like to fill your home with beautiful photographs, or need a portrait, a wedding photographed or if you are an interior designer and need photographs of your projects, contact me for a consultation.

Drawing on that degree in Art History, a passion for telling stories, and years working as a portrait and documentary photographer (And owning an Art Gallery) helps me bring a heightened sensitivity to my photography. Let's make the world a more beautiful place! Buon Appetito!

Thursday, August 19, 2010

Salmon, Corn, Rice Cake

Susan and I love salmon. We eat in at least once a week. I have dozens and dozens of recipes for Salmon Cakes. And, often, I simply use what I have available in Bruce's Kitchen.

Here is a Salmon, Corn, Rice Cake I made last week. Please note: I always purchase King, Coho, or Sockeye Salmon and I get enough for two meals, about 1 pound, sometimes a wee bit more; the first meal might be Grilled Maple-Glazed Salmon (I'll be posting that recipe in a few days)--we eat half and save half for salmon cakes.





















Ingredients:

1/2 pound cooked salmon, flaked
1/2 cup cooked rice (This time I used Basmati)
1/4 cup frozen corn
1/4 cup finely diced celery
1 tablespoon mayo
1 teaspoons Dijon
1 tablespoon Frank's Hot Sauce
1 tablespoon minced Vidalia onion
1 egg, lightly beaten
Salt and Pepper

Combine all the ingredients. Form into 4 cakes. Cook in hot oil in a pan large enough to fit all 4 cakes. Cook till brown on both sides. About 4-6 minutes per side.

Do you love salmon? How do you like to prepare it?

If you would like to fill your home with beautiful photographs, or need a portrait, a wedding photographed or if you are an interior designer and need photographs of your projects, contact me for a consultation.

Drawing on that degree in Art History, a passion for telling stories, and years working as a portrait and documentary photographer (And owning an Art Gallery) helps me bring a heightened sensitivity to my photography. Let's make the world a more beautiful place!

Monday, August 16, 2010

Fig Pizza with Bacon, Mozarella, Mint, and Tomatoes

Savored by pharaohs, sultans, and ancient Romans, you should treat yourself and a friend to this very special, sinfully delicious pizza.





















1 Moma Mary's Pizza Crust(also sold under the Stop & Shop brand)
8-10 strips bacon
16-24 whole fresh mint leaves
5 figs (I used Calimyrina Figs from Trader Joe's), remove stalks & cut each fig into 8 wedges
4 1/2 ounces mozzarella
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice
2-3 Garden Fresh Tomatoes (I used ones from my garden!)
Salt and Pepper

1. Preheat oven to 450.
2. Cut the bacon strips in half. Lay one or two mint leaves on each strip and roll up neatly. In a skillet, cook bacon rolls, seam-side down, turning gently often, to brown on all sides. Remove and set aside on paper towel.
3. Cut the mozzarella into thin slices. Seed tomatoes and coarsely chop. Add both to a bowl with figs, oil, lemon juice, salt and pepper.
4. Lightly oil crust and cook on pizza stone for about 8-10 minutes till crust is lightly brown.
5. Remove pizza crust from oven. Arrange bacon rolls and mozzarella mixture on pizza crust. Put back in oven and cook till mozzarella is melted, about 5-8 minutes.
6. Cut into slices and enjoy!

What is your favorite pizza?

If you would like to fill your home with beautiful photographs, or need a portrait, a wedding photographed or if you are an interior designer and need photographs of your projects, contact me for a consultation.

Drawing on that degree in Art History, a passion for telling stories, and years working as a portrait and documentary photographer (And owning an Art Gallery) helps me bring a heightened sensitivity to my photography. Let's make the world a more beautiful place! Buon Appetito!

Sunday, August 15, 2010

Pollo Alla Cacciatora

My Father loved Arthur Schwartz, the longtime food editor of the New York Daily News, author of many cookbooks, radio host, and called by The New York Times Magazine "a walking Google for food and restaurant knowledge."

And my Father would often share Mr. Schwartz's recipes with me--in person and over the phone: Orecchiette Con Broccoli di Rapa; Pasta e Piselli; Cozze Arriganate; Frittita di Spaghetti; Pasta e Lenticchie e Scarola; Pesce con Olive, Capperi, e Limone; Costole di Maiale Beneventana; and many more.

When my Father passed away a few years ago (May he rest in peace.), I was given his copy of Arthur Schwartz's Naples at Table. It is a great cookbook, chock-full of hundreds of delicious recipes. It is not a book with photographs but it is so well designed and written; who needs photographs? And I am a photographer!

Pollla All Cacciatora (Chicken Hunter-Style) writes Mr. Schwartz:

"Cacciatora, which in Compania is a strikingly simple dish of chicken braised in tomato sauce, is the most popular way of cooking chicken in the region and, strangely, in a place where no one agrees on anything, everyone uses rosemary as the herb and onion, not garlic, in the sauce."

Before we begin cooking, let me get one thing out and in the open: I used Garden Fresh Tomatoes from my garden, Rosemary from my garden, and both onion and garlic!




















Serves 2 (Based on a recipe by Arthur Schwartz)

3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
2 boneless chicken breasts (skinless)
1/2 onion, peeled and thinly sliced (I used a Vidalia)
2 cloves garlic, smashed
2 4-5 inch sprigs of rosemary
1/4 cup dry white wine
Salt and Pepper
Big pinch of hot red pepper flakes
3 Garden Fresh Tomatoes, seeded and coarsely chopped

1. In a pan large enough to hold the 2 chicken breasts, heat the oil over medium-high heat, and once it is hot, brown the chicken on each side.
2. When the chicken is almost browned on both sides and still in the pan, add the onion, garlic and rosemary and saute till the onion is tender, a few more minutes.
3. Season the chicken with salt, pepper, and the hot pepper flakes. Then add the white wine and cook until it has almost entirely evaporated, just a few minutes.
4. Add the tomatoes. Cover the pan, lower the heat, and let cook at a gentle simmer for about 30 minutes.
5. Remove chicken to a serving platter and cover to keep warm. Increase heat to high and let the sauce reduce for about 2 minutes.
6. Pour the sauce over the chicken.

We served this with "Susan's Waldorf Salad" which was a perfect and cooling compliment to the spicy and sweet chicken.

Sounds delicious, doesn't it? What do you think?

If you would like to fill your home with beautiful photographs, or need a portrait, a wedding photographed or if you are an interior designer and need photographs of your projects, contact me for a consultation.

Drawing on that degree in Art History, a passion for telling stories, and years working as a portrait and documentary photographer (And owning an Art Gallery) helps me bring a heightened sensitivity to my photography. Let's make the world a more beautiful place! Buon Appetito!

Friday, August 13, 2010

Salmon with Tomato-Orange Salsa



















Tomato-Orange Salsa (Based on a recipe from Moosewood)
1 large ripe tomato, diced
1 green jalapeno, seeded and minced
2 teaspoons grated orange peel
1 orange sectioned and seeded, each section cut in quarters
2 tablespoons fresh orange juice
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon ground coriander
salt and pepper to taste

Combine all of the ingredients in a bowl, and let sit for 10-15 minutes to allow flavors to blend. Covered and refrigerated, this salsa will keep 2-3 days.

Green Pigeon Peas and Rice Salad (Based on a recipe from Moosewood)
1 can Goya Green Pigeon Peas, drained and rinsed
1 cup cooked Basmati rice
2 celery stalks, finely chopped
1/4 cup sliced Spanish olives
1 teaspoon ground coriander
2 teaspoons ground cumin
1/2 cup chopped Vidalia onion
1/2 cup fresh orange juice
1 1/2 tablespoons cider vinegar
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 tablespoons grated orange peel
2 tablespoons fresh parsley

In a mixing bowl, combine the beans with the rice, celery, and Spanish olives. In a small bowl, whisk together all of the dressing ingredients. Pour the dressing over the beans and rice mixture, and stir thoroughly.

1 1/2 pounds Salmon (Coho, King or Sockeye) Grilled or Baked at 450 for 8--12 minutes. When I grill salmon, I put it on aluminum foil, close grill, and I do not turn salmon over. I used the leftover salmon for salmon cakes (recipe to follow).

I also served the salmon with braised and barely blackened carrots with fresh rosemary, based on a recipe from Patricia Wells.

Thursday, August 12, 2010

Welcome to My Kitchen!

It seems somehow appropriate that I give birth to this Blog, Bruce's Kitchen, today, August 12th, the birthday of one of my biggest fans, my daughter, Danielle.

I can still see her sitting in her baby high chair years ago in our brownstone in Weehawken, New Jersey, eating meatballs, her face covered in tomato sauce, giggling "More. More"

I have always loved cooking and I can remember I would help my father and mother prepare meals when I was a child; dicing the pepperoni for the lasagna, cutting potatoes for the frittata, slowly and gently stirring the ravioli.

Maybe the love of preparing and serving food is simply in my genes. My mother's parents owned a small diner called Lawson's Little Diner which was near the Cow Palace in San Francisco, California.

Cooking for me is all about love. Love for friends and family. Healthy, simple, inspired recipes for everyday celebrations.

May you find inspiration here.